Tag Archives: Brin Enterkin

Brin Enterkin in Uganda

“Anyone anywhere is capable of helping somebody. I hope people will see that if I can do something like this, anyone can.”

Brin Enterkin (12C) was a newly minted high school graduate when she spoke those words to her hometown paper after working to fund a school in Cambodia. A decade later, she continues to live out that credo, recently earning placement on Forbes’ “30 under 30” list of social entrepreneurs for her work to transform the education system of Uganda by stressing an interactive approach over rote memorization, thus allowing children to think more creatively and critically.

“Brin is an outstanding young alum,” said Professor of Management Paula Englis, who nominated her for the Forbes list. “She has a long history of exemplary service and the ability to make things happen to facilitate substantive change.”

Enterkin’s involvement in the African nation began in 2009 when she taught microfinancing to Ugandan women and provided comfort to patients with AIDS/HIV as part of a Berry-funded summer learning experience. By the time she graduated, she had founded a nonprofit, The African SOUP, which continues to make a difference in Uganda by blending community development with national impact. Her work has earned the attention of CNN, Huffington Post and Engage Magazine, and in 2015 she was honored with the Berry Alumni Association’s Outstanding Young Alumni Award.

Enterkin recently returned to the United States to assume a new role as president/managing director of the Watson Institute in Boulder, Colo., where she is working to create an “Olympic training ground” for other social entrepreneurs.

By student writer Kendall Aronson

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Brin Enterkin PhotoThe Huffington Post recently published a first-person blog by Brin Enterkin (12C), the 2015 recipient of Berry’s Outstanding Young Alumni Award. Enterkin (at left in photo) shared her experiences – and the lessons she’s learned – as cofounder of The African SOUP, a nonprofit started while she was a student at Berry to aid the people of Uganda. Read more.

Photo courtesy of The African SOUP

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Hundreds of alumni and friends made their way “home” May 15-17 for Alumni Weekend, with many remaining on campus in the days that followed for the 30th annual observance of Alumni Work Week.

Eight different classes celebrated reunions, with two – 1965A and 1965C – joining the ranks of Berry’s Golden Guard (a distinction reserved for alumni who have been out at least 50 years). Excellence was rewarded with presentation of the 2015 Distinguished Alumni Awards. This year’s winners included:

David Grindle (93C), Distinguished Achievement
Joy Padgett Johnson (73C), Distinguished Service
Jeff Jahn (07C), Entrepreneurial Spirit
Brin Enterkin (12C), Outstanding Young Alumni

Alumni WeekendOther individuals singled out for special recognition included retiring Director of Choral Activities Harry Musselwhite and longtime baseball coach David Beasley, Berry’s newest honorary alumni. Bettyann O’Neill and Joni Kenyon were honored with the Alumni Association President’s Award, while Tom Raulerson (66C) received the Berry High Schools/Berry Academy Outstanding Faculty/Staff Award.

The big winner among the reunion classes was the college class of 1965, which claimed the Viking Cup (highest giving percentage), Ford Cup (highest total amount given) and Heritage Cup (greatest increase in Berry Heritage Society membership). The Reunion Cup (highest percentage attendance) went to the academy class of 1965, while the college class of 1955 won the Martha Cup (greatest percentage increase in gifts). The total amount of reunion gifts contributed by all classes was an impressive $1.16 million.

Photos: Alumni Weekend

Media coverage: Berry alumni return for Work Week

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Brin Enterkin FeatureNot long ago, we were pleased to share a CNN story highlighting work done by Brin Enterkin (12C) to help the people of Uganda. Now the successful social entrepreneur is in the spotlight again, this time as the subject of a feature article in the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Foundation magazine, Engage. The publication traced her development from a Berry student teaching microfinance in Uganda to founder of The African SOUP, a nonprofit started while she was at Berry, and CEO of Lion’s Thread, a social enterprise co-founded with Sydney Hulebak (14C). Click the image to read more.

The Sullivan Foundation promotes service and social entrepreneurship on more than 60 college and university campuses. Berry is an invited participant in the foundation’s annual Algernon Sydney Sullivan and Mary Mildred Sullivan Awards program, which recognizes students whose character and dedication to service sets them apart as examples to others.

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Lion's ThreadSenior Sydney Hulebak’s participation in the Clinton Global Initiative University has resulted in a $4,000 Resolution Project grant for Lion’s Thread, a business venture she launched with Brin Enterkin (12C) that is providing opportunity and assistance for the people of Uganda. Lion’s Thread markets bow ties crafted by Ugandan women, with profits providing money for salaries, entrepreneurship training and seed funding so that the women can one day start a business of their own.

Lion’s Thread grew out of Hulebak’s involvement with the African SOUP, a nonprofit started by Enterkin that is working to improve the lives of Ugandan orphans. Hulebak was looking for a way to put her lifelong interest in fashion to work for others, and the collaboration with Enterkin provided the perfect opportunity.

Hulebak will continue her work with Lion’s Thread during the coming year while also gaining valuable nonprofit experience as a fellow with the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation in Atlanta.

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Changing Lives in UgandaThe impressive quality of Berry students and alumni has caught the attention of one of the nation’s most recognizable news organizations. Three times this spring, CNN has featured stories with a Berry connection, the most recent focusing on a group of refugee students whose pathway to future success passed through the Gate of Opportunity. Full story.

An earlier feature (click accompanying image to see video) chronicled the work Brin Enterkin (12C) has done on behalf of Ugandan orphans through the African SOUP, a nonprofit she founded as a student. The network also shared the inspirational journey of Ryan Boyle, a current student who has recovered from a near-fatal childhood accident to become a published author and Paralympic hopeful in para-cycling. Ryan’s story.

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Brin Enterkin in AfricaBrin Enterkin (12C) has been making news for her service activities since high school, when her efforts to raise funds to establish a school in rural Cambodia landed her on the cover of Fayette Woman magazine (and later in Berry magazine). As she completes her distinguished career as a Berry student, it’s only fitting that we spotlight her one more time as recipient of the $40,000 William E. Simon Fellowship for Noble Purpose Grant to support The SOUP (Sponsorship of Orphans in Uganda Project), a nonprofit she started while at Berry. More about Brin.

Junior Aaron Ostrander also earned praise this spring as one of a select group of students nationwide to be awarded the Goldwater Scholarship for his work in physics and mathematics.

On the athletic front, sophomore Kristin Brennan made her mark by claiming top honors individually in the Novice Equitation on the Flat event at the 2012 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association national championships. In team competition, Berry’s western riders logged another top-five finish. Not be be outdone, senior lacrosse player Jenny Miller finished as one of the nation’s top scorers and earned a spot in the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association Division III North-South Senior All-Star Game.

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