Tag Archives: CNN

Parisa Khosravi and Buster Wright

Berry Trustee Buster Wright (73C), right, greets Parisa Khosravi, the latest speaker in the lecture series that bears his name.

Parisa Khosravi may not have literally moved mountains, but she has rerouted a commercial airline, covered the Iraq wars and Tiananmen Square, and promoted equality and acceptance as a leader at CNN. Earlier this spring, she shared her experience and insight with Berry students through the Cecil B. Wright III Integrity in Leadership Lecture.

As an immigrant who lived through the 1979 Iranian revolution, a religious minority and a woman whose first language was not English, Khosravi had to overcome doubters who didn’t believe she was good enough to be a journalist. She refused to let them limit her potential, ultimately serving as CNN’s senior vice president of international news gathering, national news gathering, global relations and the first-ever ambassador for CNN Worldwide.

“Why would we ever allow someone else to tell us what we’re capable of?” she asked.

In her remarks, Khosravi emphasized how important it is to take care of your people and to treat them all with respect. She noted that she always made sure her employees kept tabs on their physical and mental health, especially when covering stories in war zones and other serious situations.

“As a leader, people need to know you are as good as your word and you will have their back,” she said. “And they will have your back too.”

Khosravi said that anyone can become a leader, but they have to be willing to work at it.

“People are not born leaders,” she stated. “We become leaders by how we handle ourselves in the valleys of life.”

The Cecil B. Wright III Lecture Series is an initiative of the Berry Center for Integrity in Leadership, a major priority of Berry’s LifeReady Campaign.

While on campus, Khosravi sat for a brief interview focusing on integrity and other leadership-related issues. Click the video player above to view.

By student writer Kendall Aronson

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Brin Enterkin in Uganda

“Anyone anywhere is capable of helping somebody. I hope people will see that if I can do something like this, anyone can.”

Brin Enterkin (12C) was a newly minted high school graduate when she spoke those words to her hometown paper after working to fund a school in Cambodia. A decade later, she continues to live out that credo, recently earning placement on Forbes’ “30 under 30” list of social entrepreneurs for her work to transform the education system of Uganda by stressing an interactive approach over rote memorization, thus allowing children to think more creatively and critically.

“Brin is an outstanding young alum,” said Professor of Management Paula Englis, who nominated her for the Forbes list. “She has a long history of exemplary service and the ability to make things happen to facilitate substantive change.”

Enterkin’s involvement in the African nation began in 2009 when she taught microfinancing to Ugandan women and provided comfort to patients with AIDS/HIV as part of a Berry-funded summer learning experience. By the time she graduated, she had founded a nonprofit, The African SOUP, which continues to make a difference in Uganda by blending community development with national impact. Her work has earned the attention of CNN, Huffington Post and Engage Magazine, and in 2015 she was honored with the Berry Alumni Association’s Outstanding Young Alumni Award.

Enterkin recently returned to the United States to assume a new role as president/managing director of the Watson Institute in Boulder, Colo., where she is working to create an “Olympic training ground” for other social entrepreneurs.

By student writer Kendall Aronson

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Brin Enterkin FeatureNot long ago, we were pleased to share a CNN story highlighting work done by Brin Enterkin (12C) to help the people of Uganda. Now the successful social entrepreneur is in the spotlight again, this time as the subject of a feature article in the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Foundation magazine, Engage. The publication traced her development from a Berry student teaching microfinance in Uganda to founder of The African SOUP, a nonprofit started while she was at Berry, and CEO of Lion’s Thread, a social enterprise co-founded with Sydney Hulebak (14C). Click the image to read more.

The Sullivan Foundation promotes service and social entrepreneurship on more than 60 college and university campuses. Berry is an invited participant in the foundation’s annual Algernon Sydney Sullivan and Mary Mildred Sullivan Awards program, which recognizes students whose character and dedication to service sets them apart as examples to others.

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Changing Lives in UgandaThe impressive quality of Berry students and alumni has caught the attention of one of the nation’s most recognizable news organizations. Three times this spring, CNN has featured stories with a Berry connection, the most recent focusing on a group of refugee students whose pathway to future success passed through the Gate of Opportunity. Full story.

An earlier feature (click accompanying image to see video) chronicled the work Brin Enterkin (12C) has done on behalf of Ugandan orphans through the African SOUP, a nonprofit she founded as a student. The network also shared the inspirational journey of Ryan Boyle, a current student who has recovered from a near-fatal childhood accident to become a published author and Paralympic hopeful in para-cycling. Ryan’s story.

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Kelsey Trusty with her scarves during a recent trip to Berry.

It’s not easy to find opportunity in a cancer diagnosis, and yet Kelsey Trusty (11C) has done exactly that. Diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia in October 2011, the one-time nursing student began braiding scarves out of old t-shirts as a way to keep herself occupied. Her creations became a sensation after she posted her work on Facebook, and the resulting profits have helped to subsidize her medical expenses while also providing hope for others.

Recently, Trusty’s story went national thanks to a CNN story produced by video journalist Kyler Post (11C), one of her Berry classmates.

Today, she is in remission and her business – named ‘Tussle’ as a nod to her cancer fight – is thriving. Later this summer, she plans to marry fiancé Trevor Bishop, who graduates from Berry this spring.

Read Trusty’s blog.

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